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EULOGY ON

There is no exaggeration in the assertion that Mr. WEBSTER's reply to Hayne, is one of the most powerful speeches to be found in any language; its sublime eloquence and irresistible logic sweep along with a grandeur and magnificence unsurpassed by any orator either of ancient or modern times.

"Seldom, if ever," observes Mr. March, his able biographer, "has a speaker in this or any other country had more powerful incentives to exertion. A subject, the determination of which involved the most important interests, and even duration of the Republic; competitors unequalled in reputation, ability or position; a name to make still more glorious, or lose forever; and an audience comprising not only persons of this country most eminent in intellectual greatness, but representatives of other nations, where the art of eloquence had flourished for ages. All the soldier seeks in opportunity, was here. Mr. WEBSTER perceived, and felt equal to the destinies of the moment. The very greatness of the hazard exhilerated him. His spirits rose with the occasion. He awaited the time of onset with a stern and impatient joy. He felt like the war-horse of the Scriptures, who 'paweth in the, valley, and rejoiceth in his strength; who goeth on to meet the armed men; who saith among the trumpets, Ha, ha! and who smelleth the battle afar off, the thunder of the captains, and the shouting.' A confidence in his own resources, springing from no vain estimate of his power, but the legitimate offspring of previous severe mental discipline, sustained and excited him. He had gauged his opponents, his subject, and himself."

No analysis of this great oratorical effort can possibly convey to the mind any conception of its close and irresistible logic, its withering sarcasm, the beauty of its imagery, and the splendor of its diction. Many of its passages have been selected as brilliant gems of oratory, and inserted in every treatise on elocution. His reply to Mr. Hayne's bitter attack on Massachusetts, is so full of words that burn, and thoughts that breathe, that although familiar to every one, it may well be repeated here:

"Mr. President," said he, "I shall enter on no enconium upon Massachusetts; she needs none. Behold her and judge for yourselves. There is her history; the world knows it by heart. The past at least


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