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DANIEL WEBSTER.

himself of those captivating classical allusions, which lay in such profusion in his way, be made but a single reference to Greece, as the mistress of the world in letters and arts. He treated, in a Statesmanlike manner, what he justly called the great question of the age,--the question between absolute and regulated governments, and the duty of the United States on fitting occasions to let their voice be heard on this question.

In the month of June, 1827, Mr. WEBSTER was elected to the Senate of the United States. As a Senator be took a leading part in the discussion of the various questions and measures which came up before that body. But it was not before the beginning of 1830, that be was called upon to buckle on his armor in the defence of the Constitution and the Union, in a series of efforts of transcendant ability and eloquence, for which the people, without distinction of party, bestowed on him the glorious appellation of the "Defender of the Constitution."

The startling doctrine of nullification, secession and disunion, was first openly avowed and advocated in the Senate of the United States by Mr. Hayne of South Carolina, in the debate on the resolution introduced by Mr. Foot of Connecticut, on the subject of the sale of the public lands; and it is difficult to understand how the discussion to which it gave rise, could embrace a question involving the very existence of the Government. Such, however, was the fact.

Twenty years have rolled by since the nullification agitation shook the Union to its centre, and we can scarcely realize at this distance of time the imminence of the impending danger. That Mr. WEBSTER was in a great measure instrumental, under Providence, in saving the Republic, and in averting the dreadful calamities by which it was threatened, no one will deny. His powerful appeal to the sober reason and calm judgment of the American people, hushed the angry elements which were distracting the public mind. The Orthodox political faith, which he enforced with such a sincerity of conviction and overwhelming power of argument, was first listened to, and finally embraced by many whose minds had been bewildered by the heresy of nullification.

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