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of questions, and those of the highest importance, which belong alike to the Senate and the Court. Mr. WEBSTER presents a forcible illustration of the correctness of this observation.

Nor did his forensic duties prevent him from cultivating and exercising those transcendant gifts of eloquence with which Nature had so richly endowed him. On the 22d of December, 1820, he delivered an oration of surpassing pathos and beauty, in commemoration of the landing of the Pilgrims at Plymouth. This splendid production is, among many other things, remarkable for a prediction which was realized during the orator's lifetime. Speaking of the energy, the enterprise and success of the natives of New England, he says: "It may be safely asserted, that there are now more than a million of people, descendants of New England ancestry, living free and happy in regions, which hardly sixty years ago, were tracts of unpenetrated forest. Nor do rivers, mountains or seas resist the progress of industry and enterprise. Ere long the sons of the Pilgrims will be on the shores of the Pacific."

He now stood at the head of the American Bar, almost without a rival, reaping the golden harvest of a large and profitable practice, and having before him the certain prospect of an independent fortune. The worldly wise will no doubt wonder that he should have been induced to abandon a position so advantageous and enviable. But his fellow-citizens considered that they were entitled to his services on a more enlarged sphere of action. With a patriotic devotion to his country, and a disinterestedness by which his whole life has been characterised, be responded to the call.

In 1822 he returned to political life, by being elected a member of Congress from the city of Boston. He took his seat in December, 1823. At that time the sympathies of the American people bad been strongly enlisted in behalf of regenerated and heroic Greece struggling for freedom. On the 19th of January, 1824, he pronounced his splendid and triumphant vindication of the cause of freedom and the rights of humanity, against the base and insidious machinations of that conspiracy or alliance of despots, which was blasphemously called Holy. The speech is replete with the noblest sentiments, and breathes the spirit of the loftiest patriotism in every line. Instead of availing


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