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DANIEL WEBSTER.

was the one where his own youth had been nurtured; and the moral tenderness and beauty this gave to the grandeur of his thoughts, the sort of religious sensibility it imparted to his urgent appeals and demands for the stern fulfilment of what law and justice required, wrought up the whole audience to an extraordinary state of excitement. Many betrayed strong agitation; many were dissolved in tears. When he ceased to speak, there was a perceptible interval before any one was willing to break the silence; and when that vast crowd separated, not one person of the whole number doubted, that the man who had that day so moved, astonished and controlled them, had vindicated for himself a place at the side of the first Jurists of the country." The great constitutional principles contended for by Mr. WEBSTER, in support of the rights of his Alma Mater, were fully recognized by the Court, and the act of the Legislature of the State of New Hampshire, attempting to alter the charter of Dartmouth College, was declared null and void. We may form some conception of the merits of the argument in the Dartmouth College case from the fact related by the late Mr. Justice Story, that the Supreme Court listened to Mr. WEBSTER for the first hour with perfect astonishment, for the second hour with perfect delight, and for the third hour with perfect conviction. This was the first case of any importance since the organization of the Federal Judiciary, in which the Supreme Court was called upon to exercise the high attribute with which the Constitution has invested it, of deciding questions relative to the powers of sovereign States, which in other countries can only be settled by the arbitraments of the sword. The extraordinary jurisdiction possessed by this august tribunal, is one of the most admirable features in the complicated machinery of Federal and State governments. The wisdom, prudence and firmness with which justice has been administered in that Court, have in no small degree contributed to the stability of our glorious institutions; and Mr. WEBSTER's name will be forever associated with those of Marshall, Story, Taney, and other great Judges of the modern Areopagus, who have lulled popular excitements so often produced by the conflicting rights and claims of States, by the still small voice of reason. Whatever may be the effect of professional training on the qualifications of a Statesman, it is evident that in this country there is a great class

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