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or eighty thousand of our most useful citizens are there, and are entitled to such protection from the Government as their case requires."

Such was the state of public opposition, that the argument of the youthful patriot remained unheeded, until our commerce had been almost entirely swept from the ocean. The policy of the Government was not changed until eight years afterwards. He reverted to the subject in an oration delivered in 1812; and in 1814, he again made a powerful appeal for the protection of our commerce, in one of his first speeches delivered in Congress. "Unclinch," he exclaims, "the iron grasp of your embargo. Take measures for that end before another sun sets upon you. With all the war of the enemy on your commerce, if you would cease to make war upon it yourselves, you would still have some commerce."

The policy thus so eloquently and perseveringly advocated by Mr. WEBSTER, was at last adopted, and its results soon verified his predictions.

In August, 1816, Mr. WEBSTER removed to Boston, retired from active political life, and devoted himself, during a period of six years, exclusively to the duties of his profession. It was at this time that his reputation as a Lawyer was fixed. He took his position in the front rank of the great Jurists who then adorned the Boston Bar. At this period, too, he made some of those great forensic efforts, as a Constitutional Lawyer, which placed him beyond all competition in that highest branch of jurisprudence. He argued the celebrated Dartmouth College case before the Supreme Court of the United States, on the 10th of March, 1818. It involved the question, whether the Legislature of New Hampshire possessed the constitutional power to alter the charter of Dartmouth College without the consent of the corporation? Mr. Ticknor describes this great effort as follows : "He opened his cause, as he always did, with perfect simplicity, in the general statement of its facts, and then went on to unfold the topics of his argument in a lucid order, which made each position sustain every other. The logic and the law were rendered irresistible; but as he advanced, his heart warmed to the subject and the occasion. Thoughts and feelings that had grown old with his best affection, rose unbidden to his lips. He remembered that the institution he was defending,


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