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DANIEL WEBSTER.

study of the Book of Books, as well as the writings of the ancient and modern classics. Such were the preparations with which Mr. WEBSTER embarked on the voyage of active, busy life. He was admitted to the Bar in May, 1807, and in September following be settled in Portsmouth, where he remained in the practice of the law for nine successive years.

His political career commenced in May, 1813, by his taking his seat as a member of Congress from his native State. Since that period, he has, with short intervals, performed an active part on the great theatre of public life. To follow him step by step through those busy, varied, and often spirit-stirring scenes, would far exceed the limits of this address.

In whatever point of view Mr. WEBSTER's character is considered, we discover in it every element of true greatness and goodness. One of his distinguishing characteristics was, that while be was gifted with a towering intellect to direct his thoughts, he possessed a warm and generous heart to give a proper impulse to his feelings.

From the very beginning of his political life he was a Statesman, in the true sense of the word; his conduct was always governed by principles, to which he steadily adhered through good and evil report. The politician trims his sail to catch the popular breeze ; but the statesman is frequently compelled to face the storm of popular opinion, at the, risk of his own political existence. Mr. WEBSTER was often exposed to this peril, and never shrank from it. As early as 1806, be took part in the discussion of the momentous question which then

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