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HENRY CLAY.

this instance of popular injustice, rather an augmentation than a diminution of the glory that encircles his name? Did the refusal of the Emperor Tiberius to grant the triumph demanded by Dolabella for his conquests in Africa, detract from, or add to, the glory of his achievements? The accomplished historian has, with characteristic brevity and energy, given us the answer: Huic negatus honor gloriam intendit.*

Let not the honors we render this day to the memory of our departed patriot, cease with the ceremonies of this solemn occasion. There are yet others in reserve, which it becomes us, fellow-citizens, in common with our countrymen throughout the Union, to award, in commemoration of his illustrious services. Let us rear aloft the marble monument to his memory. Let us present to our own generation, and to those who are destined soon to fill the places which we now occupy, his beloved and venerable form, as an object of eternal gratitude and regard. Let us behold him still erect, as we were wont to view him in life, while he stood forth the dauntless champion of his Country's rights, and the watchful guardian of her Constitution. Let us behold him as the plastic hand of an American Republican Artist only can present him to our admiring gaze. Let the fame of the Statesman and the Artist thus become blended in the remembrance of posterity. Let the name of HIRAM POWERS be associated with that of HENRY CLAY, through all time, like the name of Flaxman with that of Nelson; like the name of Michael Angelo with that of Lorenzo de Medici; like the name of Lysippus with that of Alexander; like the name of Phidias with that of his Olympian Jove. And when, hereafter, the shapeless block of marble torn from the classic quarries of Carrara, shall take its place upon the easel, let the artist remember, that no naval hero, however glorious; no magnificent patron of letters and arts, with the commerce of nations tributary to his sway; no conqueror of the world, with his invincible phalanx at his heels; no Pagan god with all his Olympian thunders, ever formed a nobler subject for the inspiration of the sculptor's genius, than the peerless Orator, the incorruptible Statesman, the self-sacrificing Patriot of his own mountain land.

*Tacitus.

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