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HENRY CLAY.

As an Orator, Mr. CLAY has, by common consent, long been regarded as the first on the roll of great names in our country. His eloquence was in perfect unison with his general character. It was bold, ardent, and impassioned; and when prompted by great excitement, gushed like a torrent from the heart. The very fountains of his soul seemed to be broken up, and amid the rush of tumultuous emotions, he was utterly unconscious of the external world. With an easy flow of language that never failed him; with a voice ever under the most perfect control, and attuned to the sweetest harmony, now rising like the full tones of an organ, "till sound seemed piled upon sound," and now falling into the softest melody,--no orator perhaps ever exercised a more commanding and entrancing influence over the feelings of an audience. There was an awful grandeur in his denunciation, before which the coldest and most philosophical opponent stood appalled; but in his pathetic appeals to the passions, there was a charm which never failed to awaken the tenderest sensibilities of the human heart. His speeches on the subject of the war, are striking examples of these qualities. He was an enemy to all sophistry. As a logician, he was clear, cogent, and profound. He was laborious in his researches, and rarely engaged in debate upon a great measure of public interest without being fortified by an accumulation of facts, which the dispassionate, unprejudiced mind found it difficult to resist. Many of his best efforts have never been published, and are now irretrievably lost. His speech on the Missouri Compromise, like that of Mr. Pinkney on the same subject, has never been given to the public in a form to enable his countrymen to judge of the effect of that appeal, which originally secured for him the proud appellation of the Great Pacificator. But even if we possessed all that is lost, we should still feel, as we hung over the glowing pages, that there was yet wanting something to complete the charm; something which the inimitable manner, and the musical, clarion-toned voice of the orator himself could alone supply. We should be reminded, at every step of our progress, of the story of the celebrated Ęschines, while a teacher of Rhetoric at Rhodes. In response to the enthusiastic plaudits of his students upon hearing him read the oration of Demosthenes upon the Crown, the generous rival and antagonist of

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