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HENRY CLAY.

wielded "the pen of a ready writer;" while his excellent judgment, great prudence and practical intelligence rendered him at all times an efficient coadjutor and a safe councillor of his distinguished associates in the commission. He not only aided in bringing to an honorable close the war of 1812, but subsequently also, in conjunction with Messrs. Adams and Gallatin, as we have already seen, in securing by the Commercial Convention signed in London, on the 3d of July, 1815, those reciprocal advantages for our commerce and navigation, which proved to be so effectual in enabling our enterprising merchants to recover from the paralyzing consequences of the war. His easy and conciliatory deportment, his perfect freedom from all duplicity, and from that mysterious, enigmatical style of conducting diplomatic conferences, once so common at the different courts of Europe, gained for him the respect and confidence of the English negotiators.

The prudence and wisdom of Mr. Madison were never more happily displayed than in the appointment of the members of the Commission to adjust our difficulties with Great Britain. There was Adams, learned on all subjects, and fortified by a thorough knowledge of international law; there was Gallatin, ready in all financial details, and familiar with the commerce of the globe; and there was CLAY, bearing the reputation of an orator of rare abilities, quick to discover an advantage, and prompt in turning it to the interest of his cause, ever active, ever vigilant, looking alike to the present honor and ultimate prosperity of the country. Such an array of talent and ability could not fail to exert a favorable impression on the diplomatists of the proud and haughty nation before whom the rights of our young Republic were to be vindicated, and her high character maintained. It formed an appropriate sequel to the gallant exploits of our Army and Navy. England learned for the first time, that she was neither the mistress of the ocean, nor the undisputed arbiter of nations; that we not only possessed a power to check her progress upon the land and upon the ocean, but also a moral and intellectual ability to teach her the great and immutable principles of international justice.

It has been truly, said that the diplomacy of our country was never more efficiently conducted than during the time our foreign relations were committed to Mr. CLAY. The number of treaties he

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