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the contingency of war, and to those calamities which war must inevitably entail upon every great commercial nation. What would be the condition of our country without manufactures, and without the facilities of transportation from one part of the Union to the other, for cannon and other munitions of war, while the fleets of a powerful enemy are sweeping the ocean, and prowling along our coasts? The policy of Mr. CLAY demanded the aid of Government, for the prosecution of what individual resources and individual energy in the earlier period of our history were inadequate to accomplish. He aimed at the security of our commercial independence, and of our internal prosperity, at all times, and in every emergency.

With the zeal and energy displayed by our great champion of Universal Liberty, in the cause of South American and Grecian Independence, you are all familiar. His speech in support of his proposition to send a minister to the United Provinces of the Rio de La Plata, is one of the ablest and most elaborate arguments which emanated from the illustrious Statesman during his whole public career. It is full of historical information and statistical details, and evinces by its laborious research, the deep, heartfelt anxiety of its author to secure for the colonies the encouragement of our own Government, in the establishment of that political independence for which they were nobly contending. His speech in support of Mr. WEBSTER's proposition to send a commissioner to Greece, is a short but gallant appeal in behalf of a people, in whose favor the sympathies of every humane heart would be naturally and most warmly enlisted. There cannot be presented to the imagination of a true friend of liberty, a spectacle more grand and imposing than was exhibited in the Congress of our Republic, when CLAY and WEBSTER, the great Orators of America, stood forth the undaunted advocates of the restoration of freedom to the land of Pericles and Demosthenes.

The exertions of Mr. CLAY in behalf of both South America and Greece, were zealously continued during the time be was at the head of the Department of State under the administration of Mr. Adams; and with what success, we shall presently have occasion to notice.

As a diplomatist his abilities were displayed to the greatest advantage. In the negotiations which led to the Treaty of Ghent, he


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