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HENRY CLAY.

It would be impossible fellow-citizens, within the limits of this occasion, to notice with minuteness, the splendid services of Mr. CLAY. We shall therefore glance at a few of the most important public measures, and the most prominent political events in the history of the country, with which his name has been intimately associated.

We cannot, as Louisianians, pass unnoticed his zealous exertions on the subject of the navigation of the Mississippi; his able and eloquent assertion of the rights of our Government to the district of country lying between the Mississippi and Perdido Rivers, a large portion of which now forms a part of our own State; his Active participation in the proceedings of Congress, which enabled Louisiana to form a constitution, and to gain admission into the Union upon an equality with the other members of the Confederacy; and his strenuous efforts in favor of the maintenance of a naval force in the Gulf of Mexico, for the protection of the commerce of the valley of the Mississippi. These are services which create a local interest in his fame, and which acquire an increasing importance whenever we compare the present position of Louisiana with what it was a short time after she passed from the dominion of France and Spain, to form one in that great family of Independent States, whose commerce is upon every ocean, and whose flag is upon every breeze.

But it is rather as citizens of the Union, that we love to dwell upon the services of Mr. CLAY. We love to recur to that dark period in our history, made bright and glorious by American valor and American genius; a period when the Republic was called upon to vindicate her honor against wrongs committed upon her commerce by England and France, under the Berlin and Milan decrees, and the British orders in council. Under the pretext of prosecuting legitimate hostilities in pursuance of these retaliatory measures, the most atrocious depredations were committed by both nations upon our neutral trade. And while France was induced by our stern remonstrances to abandon her unjust and abominable policy, so far at least as it related to American vessels, England continued to persevere in her course of arrogance and oppression, until an indignant people demanded vengeance for her unprovoked hostilities upon the property of our

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