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HENRY CLAY.

again in the House of Delegates of Virginia, on the claims of the supernumerary officers in the service of the State, during the Revolutionary War. Mr. CLAY retained through life a vivid recollection of the appearance and manner of that extraordinary man. The impression of his eloquent powers on his mind was, "that their charm consisted mainly in one of the finest voices ever heard, in his graceful gesticulation, and the variety and force of expression exhibited in his countenance."* Those who have listened to the eloquence of Mr. CLAY, will remember bow preeminently be was distinguished for these very characteristics of the orator, which had impressed his own mind, as prominent ornaments in the eloquence of his renowned exemplar. We can easily imagine the effect which a popular or forensic effort of such a man as Patrick Henry, would produce upon such a mind as Nature had given to young CLAY. We can easily depict in our imaginations the beaming countenance of the youthful auditor, as he follows with rapture and delight the daring flights of an orator whose fame be was even then resolved to emulate. We recall the picture of the young Thucydides listening with tearful interest to the beautiful history of Heroditus, as it was read to the admiring multitude at Olympia; and that of the young Demosthenes, retiring from the applauding throng, upon the conclusion of an oration of Callistratus, to meditate in retirement on the thrilling scene through which he had passed, and under the influence of the fire of inspiration still glowing in his heart, to renew those intellectual toils through which alone be too might hope to win that popular applause, which to the ear of young ambition, is sweeter than the music of the spheres.

The professional success of Mr. CLAY in his adopted State far surpassed his fondest hopes, and was in all respects such as might be confidently anticipated from his previous assiduity and exemplary conduct. His energetic devotion to business, his superior talents as an advocate, and his honorable bearing as a man, secured for him popular favor and popular confidence; and the young and friendless attorney who had rejoiced over his first fee of fifteen shillings, soon found himself in possession of a lucrative practice, and holding a high

* Life of Mr. CLAY by Eppes Sargent.

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