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HENRY CLAY.

for whose foreordained destruction, there were those who paused not to

Distort the truth, accumulate the lie,
And pile the pyramid of calumny;

the man, who single handed against a host, had flattered his assailants "like an eagle in a dove cote--alone he did it;" who stormed the very citadel of calumny, and planted the victorious banner of Truth upon its walls; the man who was ever ready to compromise upon a measure of public policy affecting the security of the union of these States; but whose chivalric soul ever scorned to compromise a principle, in thought or deed, whenever his own honor or the honor of his country was involved. It is for the loss of such a Statesman, such a Patriot, such a Political Champion, such a Civic Hero, that a grateful and admiring people have been called to mourn. All political animosities are forgotten, or buried forever in his honored grave. His eloquence, his patriotism, the incorruptible purity of the Man, and the comprehensive wisdom and unerring forecast of the Statesman, are alone remembered. In the language of Macauley depicting the sorrows of England for the death of Lord Chatham: "Detraction is overawed. The voice of even just and temperate censure is mute. Nothing is remembered but the lofty genius, the unsullied probity, the undisputed services of him, who is no more. For once all parties are agreed."

The life Of Mr. CLAY presents a striking illustration of the superior advantages afforded by our free republican institutions for the development of all those attributes of moral and intellectual power which constitute the truly great man. It demonstrates the efficacy of that noble self-reliance which poised upon an indomitable will, and disdaining all foreign aid, recoiling from no shock however violent, and dismayed at no peril however appalling, steadily pursues its end, and patiently but surely works out the salvation and triumph of its possessor.

Mr. CLAY was born in Hanover County, Virginia, on the 12th of April, 1777, nine months after the Declaration of Independence; and it may therefore be truly said that his infancy was cradled amid the storms of the Revolution. The first lesson taught him by maternal affection was the story of his country's suffering, and of the heroic

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