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JOHN C. CALHOUN.

in the more copious eloquence which was the improvement of the next generation. He had the first requisite of a great orator--he was a good man, and his character stood as a guaranty for the truth of what he said and of the sincerity with which it was uttered. In the most exciting stages of debate his mode of argument was fair and manly--never losing himself in confusion, nor seeking to embarass his adversary by taking any undue advantage. Nothing could divert him from the even tenor of his way--from the dignity with which he always bore himself. He seemed to feel an unlimited confidence in his own powers, and to speak from the fullness of knowledge. He treated most subjects without putting forth his strength, convincing his hearers by what he said of the store which he held in reserve. But on the great questions which called forth the exertion of all his force, the resources of his intellect, his admirable exercise of the reasoning faculty, his comprehensive knowledge of political science, never failed to produce an effect memorable in the annals of Senatorial eloquence. This effect was by no means confined to those who entertained his opinions or who advocated the same cause with him; those who differed from him most--those who were, as it were, alienated from him by adverse sentiments--were not less the admirers of his talent, and proud of him as one of the brilliant lights of his country. His discourses were sustained throughout without being formal or too stately. He appeared to disdain every thing like mere ornament, and never introduced anything in his speeches which did not contribute to the effect of the whole. He took no pride in overcoming the difficulty of a moment and becoming the hero of an occasion, and little interest in the ephemeral purposes of party. His aim was higher--it was directed with a single view to the great interests of the country. He never descended from his elevation by the introduction of anything personal or trivial, or any attempt at wit. At all times prepared for discussion on the subjects as they presented themselves for consideration, he was equally prompt and ready in the defence of his conduct and opinions. On occasions of this sort, some of his most successful oratorical efforts were made. He was master of the weapons of satire and sarcasm, which be seemed to forbear to make use of from a consciousness of his strength, and never employed,

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