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EULOGY ON

With the principles of mathematics and the kindred sciences he was familiar, and kept up his knowledge of their progress and new applications. His favorite studies were the moral and political sciences. He knew thoroughly the history of man in the different phases of civilization through which be has passed. Every thing that has fallen from him is replete with the evidence of his deep reflection on the duties and relations of communities and of the citizens to the State. His well directed industry and economy of time enabled him to prepare in the latter part of his life his profound and elaborate Treatise on Government--the result of his meditations and enlarged experience.

The fascination of Mr. CALHOUN's colloquial powers all have felt who have enjoyed the advantage of listening to his conversations. They were most eloquent, and were important elements of his influence over the minds of men. He was exceedingly regular and temperate in his habits, and without any taste for ostentation or luxury. His deportment was dignified and prepossessing, at the same time imposing. A strict and habitual observer of the proprieties of life in all his relations, public and private, be exhibited in himself the model of a christian, gentleman, and citizen.

But it was within the more intimate circle of his personal friends that his character was more highly appreciated. His candor, his truth, his fidelity, the entire absence of anything approaching indirection or concealment in his social relations, as well as the kindness of his affections, created an attachment on the part of his friends which is rarely witnessed. Its force has been manifested a thousand times in the zeal and devotion with which he has been defended, and the steadfastness with which on all occasions their sincerity has been maintained. It was shown during his illness by their increasing anxiety, and at his death by their heartfelt and profound affliction, which revives with every incident which calls up the memory of their departed friend.

It is evident from the writings and speeches of Mr. CALHOUN, that he had studied with advantage the great masters of ancient eloquence. He appears to have arrived at the strength and brevity of the Greek of the times of Thucydides in the close energy of his sentences and the abrupt rapidity of his thoughts--sometimes indulging


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