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JOHN C. CALHOUN.

his opponents, as well as by his friends, bespoke their deep conviction of his worth. Nor were any more forward in doing justice to the deceased than his illustrious rivals in the career of glory, whose services we are now commemorating with his own.

Notwithstanding the prominent position of Mr. CALHOUN, his private life has been but little known. The close attention which he always gave to his public duties and the labor which they required, the character of his intellectual pursuits, and his habits of reflection and study, left him little time for anything else. During his intervals of leisure, agriculture and the management of his estate were his amusement as well as his occupation. He never suffered himself to be weaned from the claims of home; and his duties as a husband, a father, and the head of a family, were fulfilled in a manner equally amiable and exemplary. The associations of affection and friendship which clustered round the circle of his family, he kept alive and adorned by his unreserved and kind intercourse, and the genial influence of his well stored intelligence. His watchful interest in those whom Providence had committed to his charge, was never weakened or abated by the cares of public life. On all occasions he manifested the warmest interest in the education and welfare in the youth of the country. Accessible to all, attractive in his manner, his society was eagerly sought by the young, and few left him without some agreeable and useful impression: he lost no occasion of conveying to them such ideas as would tend to strengthen their purposes of good, and elevate their views of duty. He was always pleased when an opportunity presented itself of holding intercourse with young men, and his acquaintance with the studies of youth gave great value to his conversation, which was enhanced by the kindest manner and the interest he seemed to take in their future welfare. Nor was this appearance delusive. His intercourse with the world had not dried up the deep sympathies of his nature, nor diminished his feelings of benevolence towards his fellow men.

The condition and admirable order of his farm, and the regularity with which his private affairs were conducted, were the result of only a portion of his leisure during his retirement from public business. He sought information on all subjects which directly interested humanity.

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