54
EULOGY ON

of the United States. This vast addition to the territory of the United States was neither sought in the spirit of conquest nor obtained for purposes of aggrandizement, but as a means of providing for the future security and peace of the Union. It was a measure of high public policy, the advantages of which were not so apparent at the time as to prevent a violent opposition; but on a mature consideration of the relations existing between this country and Texas, their union was evidently little short of a necessity.

The accession of Mr. Polk to the Presidency found Mr. CALHOUN again in private life; but the alarm created by the Oregon question, called him from his retirement to place him once more in that body in which he would be enabled to exercise a controlling influence. His opinions were known to be eminently pacific. Familiar with the origin of the question and the different unsuccessful attempts to adjust it--from his recent position of Secretary of State possessing all the information concerning its condition, he thought it involved the issues of peace or war, and put forth his unremitted and anxious efforts in the Senate for its adjustment.

Mr. CALHOUN was opposed to the late war with Mexico. He was essentially a man of peace, and looked upon war as in direct conflict with our policy, and detrimental in its consequences to our institutions. The war of 1812, which he advocated and supported throughout, he considered as called for by our national honor, and necessary to our national independence. Since that period whenever he took any part in our relations with foreign powers, his counsels were marked with moderation and his views were almost exclusively pacific.

We are thus brought near the close of the career of this great man, who for a period of almost forty years had been before the public eye in conspicuous public situations, in the midst of the most bitter conflict of parties, and in active connection with all the prominent events of our history during that time.

At the time of the decease of Mr. CALHOUN, he was the representative of the great mass of opinion in the Southern States in relation to their rights under the Federal Constitution respecting Slavery, which opinion was fortified by an immense support in other parts of


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