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JOHN C. CALHOUN.

Having acted a distinguished part in all the great political questions of his time, he has left to posterity the means of forming a just appreciation of his conduct, his views, and his principles. His powers have been tested in various ways and in different spheres.

His Senatorial labors being the most recent, and having been directed to those all absorbing topics which still occupy the public mind, form an interesting part of our history and claim a large share of public attention. As they were the result of reflection and experience under great opportunities of observation during his political life, they will probably be considered hereafter as the crowning glory of his name. It is fortunate for a statesman of his enlarged mind that it should be employed on subjects of great and enduring moment involving not only the welfare and prosperity of the present, but the peace and security of the future and not wasted or its force weakened by being thrown away upon matters of a selfish and ephemeral interest. It does not appear that such matters ever engaged his attention: the movement of his intellect was high, and all his purposes were elevated and sincere.

It is highly creditable to the people of the United States that their divisions and contests among themselves have been upon questions of polity deeply affecting their political and material interests, and that these questions after examination, discussion, and sometimes violent agitation, have been determined generally by a very decided weight of public opinion, and subsequently acquiesced in generally. A general system of internal improvements by the Government of the United States at one time found favor with a majority; but on a partial experiment its abuses were so monstrous and its disastrous consequences so apparent, that after a fair test of the popular sentiment it was abandoned.

The cause of the measures of the State of South Carolina just stated, was the abuse of the protective system which bore oppressively on the agricultural interests, to which the schemes of internal improvements furnished aliment by requiring large disbursements of public money--raised by an unjust and unequal taxation, and expended in a manner to operate on the worst weakness of humanity in purchasing support. The power of the protective system became immense, and

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