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EULOGY ON

and anarchy, it was one of peace and safety; and that its existence and recognition would impress moderation and justice upon the action of the General Government. These doctrines descend to posterity under the sanction of his great name.

The debate which followed on this occasion was one of the most memorable in our history--it was addressed to the standard of the highest intelligence, and did honor to all who took part in it. The foundations of our Government were thoroughly examined and discussed with an ability rarely equalled, and the whole debate was conducted with the elevation and dignity which the gravity of the subject required. However unsuccessful Mr. CALHOUN had been in establishing his doctrines under the theory of the Constitution, there was but one impression as to his great ability, whether displayed in assailing the positions of his antagonists, or in fortifying and defending his own.

This discussion, involving as it did the gravest questions that ever occur with us, furnishes the most thorough exposition of the origin and theory of our political system which has yet been produced, and affords materials invaluable to the future historian and statesman. The conduct of Mr. CALHOUN in this controversy between the General Government and the State of South Carolina, was necessarily subject to severe animadversion. The weight of his influence, moral and political, which was thus brought to bear against the Union, was looked upon with no favor by a large majority of his political friends, but without injuring in the slightest degree their confidence in the purity of his motives or the elevation of his purpose--sentiment on the part of those who entertained the most opposite opinions to his, was one of regret without unkindness or the least asperity.

Mr. CALHOUN remained in the Senate until after the ratification of the Ashburton treaty in 1843, devoting his whole resources of knowledge and experience to the investigation and settlement of the important questions of public policy which were under consideration during that period. He was afterwards called from his retirement to fill the office of Secretary of State under the administration of Mr. Tyler, and was subsequently returned again to the Senate during that of Mr. Polk, and remained in that body until his death.


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