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JOHN C. CALHOUN.

tion, and without this, all education is for the most part of little use either to the individual or to society. Under our free institutions what is the State but an aggregation of families? The impressions which the child receives from the parent within the magic circle of home, are never effaced. Misfortune, depravity, crime, even time, which spares nothing else, are powerless to destroy them. If these early impressions are for good, the foundation is laid, and learning and knowledge may well be based upon it. The parental education in early life is not only the best, but the safety of the State rests in a measure upon it. As long as the sanctity of the family and its duties are sustained, self-government can maintain itself in security. This education Mr. CALHOUN received under circumstances the most favorable for the future development of his intellectual powers, which were neither weakened by undue excitement, nor diverted to trifling or frivolous subjects, but employed about the duties and relations of men. The manner in which his youthful mind was trained, necessarily led him to reflection and the appreciation of the value and beauty of intellectual pursuits. His reading was probably interrupted and desultory, and it does not appear that be had the benefit of any classical instruction until after his manhood. He entered Yale College in 1802, and was graduated two years afterwards. His attainments there show that the time of his youth bad been usefully employed. He had brought with him habits of application and a maturity of intellect which enabled him easily to master his collegiate studies, while his sense of duty saved him from idleness and the allurements of pleasure. His position in the institution was of the highest distinction, and he bad the good fortune to receive the praise of its distinguished head, by whom it was an honor to be praised, and who with unerring sagacity predicted the future brilliant success of his pupil. Nor was the impression less strong among the fellow students of Mr. CALHOUN, and among the traditions of the college his name is always mentioned as one of its brightest ornaments. After having been graduated he became a student of law, and after his admission to the bar, he practised for a few years with distinction in his native State.

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