A DISCOURSE
UPON THE LIFE, CHARACTER AND PUBLIC SERVICES OF
JOHN C. CALHOUN,
PRONOUNCED BEFORE THE CITIZENS OF NEW ORLEANS, DECEMBER 9th, 1852, BY GEORGE EUSTIS, L. L. D., CHIEF JUSTICE OF THE STATE OF LOUISIANA.

FELLOW CITIZENS:
The duty assigned to me in the ceremonies of the day, is to address you on the life and character of JOHN C. CALHOUN.

A meeting of our citizens was convened immediately after his death, and I was honored with an invitation to deliver an eulogy on that occasion.

The condition of the public mind on those topics with which Mr. CALHOUN's political course had been identified, was deemed at the time too excited for a proper appreciation of its merits. This objection has been gradually removed, until this imposing ceremony in honor of the illustrious American triumvirate responds to the popular voice in homage to the memory of CALHOUN.

The lapse of time since his decease has offered opportunities for a more deliberate consideration of his character, and the events which have since transpired enable us better to judge of the sincerity and sagacity of his political views, and to do greater justice to his motives and opinions.

As we can all recollect, the intelligence of his death was received with consternation by the people of Louisiana. It was visible on every countenance, and every one seemed to feel that a great calamity had befallen him. Men's minds were disturbed by the aspect of affairs at the Capitol, and the counsels of CALHOUN were looked up to in the emergency. The influence of his intellect, and strong hold upon public opinion, was regarded as one of the main preservatives of

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