38
HISTORY OF THE

proteges dressed in their usual plain, neat uniform. The whole Procession was closed by the Association of Stevedores, who to the number of thirty, rode on horseback, and volunteered to take the position in the ranks held by them.

It is impossible to describe the ensemble produced by this imposing body, numbering as it did over five thousand persons, each arrayed in some insignia of mourning. What with the variety and amount of rich or elegant costumes and banners, and continued streams of music filling the air, the effect was quite bewildering. The coup d'oeil of the long column and the spectators, filling up the street, and seen from a distance was truly grand and impressive.

The Procession took exactly one hour and forty minutes to pass any one particular point; its length was over one mile and a half; and from the time it left Lafayette Square to the time it returned there was two hours and half.

On arriving at the Square, by St. Charles street, the Washington Regiment, under Col. Wood, entered, and formed on either side of the avenue leading from the street to the Cenotaph. Up this armed avenue to the platform of the Cenotaph marched the Officiating Clergy, the Orators of the Day, then the Committee of Arrangements, Commanding Officers with their Staffs, the Officers of the Army, Revenue Service, and the Veterans of 1814-15, saluted as they passed by the Washington Regiment.

The rest of the Procession then filed into the Square. The Kentucky and Massachusetts delegations occupied the north side, facing the Cenotaph; the Masons and Odd Fellows were in their rear. The U. S. Artillery was drawn up at the foot of the Cenotaph on the Camp street side; the Battalion of Artillery took up the ground in their rear. The Legion, on the same side, opposite the Battalion, was covered in front by the South Carolina delegation, who stood near the south-east corner of the Cenotaph. The Firemen, the Civic Societies, and boys of the schools took up the whole of the south side of the Square.

Presently up the guarded avenue, from St. Charles street, marched a band of music, followed by the thirty-one Pall Bearers in their


Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104