30
HISTORY OF THE

kept clear of all intruders by the Police and by the Volunteer Military Company of Crescent Rifles, commanded by Capt. J. J. Casey, and attached to the Washington Regiment under Col. Wood.

All-night long, despite the drenching rain, the workmen, lighted by the glare of many torches, had been busy in erecting the grand Cenotaph, designed by Mr. A. Mondelli, long known in this city as a scenic artist of distinguished ability. Daylight found the wearied laborers still at their task, but they relaxed no work for all that, and the tall and imposing monument was completed in time. It held the centre of the Square, and towered to a height that attracted the eye at a considerable distance. Though the materials of which it was composed were simply painted wood and canvass, it bore an admirable resemblance to marble. The design was a classic structure of the Composite order, being, in outline, a broad pedestal or base, with wide and deep buttresses projecting on the same level, one from each side, and ornamented at the corners by tall bronzed tripods. Two flights of steps, one fronting on St. Charles, the other on Camp Street, led to the central platform, which was surmounted by an elegant dome upreared on four tall, slender columns, the dome being crowned by a large gilt eagle, and the whole structure adorned with flowing and tastefully arranged mourning drapery, with emblems and inscriptions appropriate to the occasion. The large space under the dome, on the platform, was open on the four sides, and was sufficiently elevated to enable any one in the street, a good distance off, to see what would take place there. Its centre was occupied by a high altar covered with black velvet, and intended to receive the urns. The Cenotaph measured at the base, including the buttresses, eighty-four by sixty feet, and was sixty feet in height. It presented a very chaste and elegant appearance, and was the object of general admiration.

At an early hour, the United States troops from the Barracks below the city, marched throgh the streets and took up the position assigned them in the Square. They numbered two companies, under the command of Lieut. Col. Nauman, of the U. S. Fourth Artillery. Their neat, soldiery appearance made them a conspicuous feature in the Procession.


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