29

FUNERAL CEREMONIES

The flags of the large number of ships, steamboats and steamers in port were displayed at half-mast; the bells of the numerous churches answered each other at measured intervals in deep, sullen tones; the flags of the foreign consuls were appropriately suspended at half-mast and draped in mourning; the public buildings, hotels, newspaper offices, arsenals, clubs, had the national banner floating to the breeze, with streamers and rosettes, and bands of crape, significantly expressing the interest of their display.

The streets presented, besides this strange appearance of gloomy devices and drapery stretching far in the distance in any direction the eye selected, the impressive and never tiring one of thousands on thousands of men, women and children, most of them dressed as if for a holiday, moving in closely-pressed throngs, pouring along unceasingly and slowly and steadily, meeting in masses at the corners, but crossing or mingling with each other without confusion or noise. Indeed, the order and decorum displayed throughout the entire day by this immense multitude of human beings, without the necessity of a police corps to control or dirict their movements, formed a subject of general and admiring comment, and one for much reflection.

Business was everywhere suspended, of course, from the Courts and Municipal offices, the Post Office and U. S. Customhouse, to stores, shops, counting-houses, and even the humblest establishment of the humblest individual. The vast Levee was silent and almost deserted; the apparently never ending crescent-formed row of triply moored shipping, and stately steamers and steamboats, was deserted by the swarm of human beings that usually cluster around its track.

Lafayette Square was from an early hour the central point of attraction. A dense mass of gazers swarmed around it, continually on the move, long ere the moment arrived for the assembling of the corps that were to form the procession. The wide and lofty flight of steps and the portico of the marble walled and pillared City Hall, and the balconies, windows, doors, and even the roofs of the fine private residences surrounding the Square, were packed with spectators, most of whom were ladies, while every foot of space in the four streets enclosing it was occupied. The large and beautiful Square itself was

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