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EULOGY ON

iron chain of military power encircles them; they live and stand under a Government popular in its form, representative in its character, founded upon principles of equality, and so constructed, we hope, as to last forever. In all its history it has been beneficent; it has trodden down no man's liberty; it has crushed no State. Its daily respiration is liberty and patriotism. Its yet youthful veins are full of enterprise, courage, and honorable love of glory and renown. Large before, the country has now, by recent events, become vastly larger. This Republic now extends, with a vast breadth, across the whole continent. The two great seas of the world wash the one and the other shore. We realise, on a mighty scale, the description of the ornamental border of the buckler of Achilles:--

'Now, the broad shield complete, the artist crowned
With his last hand, and poured the ocean round;
In living silver seemed the waves to roll,
And beat the buckler's verrge, and bound the whole.'"

Shortly after this speech had been delivered, the venerable Hero of Buena Vista died, and our present excellent Chief Magistrate was called upon to fill the Executive Chair. Mr. WEBSTER was appointed Secretary of State. It is needless to dwell on the ability with which he discharged the functions of that high trust, and how far be contributed to the success of President Fillmore's administration, for it is fresh in our memories.

When we consider Mr. WEBSTER's character in the domestic and social relations of life, it equally inspires us with respect and admiration. Those tender feelings and sacred affections which endear and hallow the family circle, gushed profusely from his heart during a long life; nor was their current interrupted by the frost of age, or the distraction and turmoil of public cares. In the dedication of his works, as late as 1851, he gives expression to those feelings in the most touching manner. As a friend he was warm and sincere, and as an enemy he was placable and forgiving. He lost the nomination for the Presidency last June, because he had felt it his duty to oppose the appointment of a prominent politician to fill the vacancy on the bench of the Supreme Court of the United States, occasioned by the death of Mr. Justice Woodbury; still he spoke of the gentleman by whom


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